In the Kitchen : Pumpkin Pear Soup

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This Pumpkin Pear Soup is a delicious and warming meal on its own or paired with a salad or homemade spelt rolls. It is also a wonderful recipe for the whole family to make together.

Very young children can cut a soft, ripe pear with a blunt knife and add a dash of cinnamon to the pot (be careful that they don’t inhale or try to eat the dry cinnamon!).

Older children can help peel and cut the butternut pumpkin and use the can opener to open the coconut milk.

All the children can help to knead dough if you’re making rolls, spin the salad if you’re serving and set the table.

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Pumpkin Pear Soup

Ingredients

  • 1/2 onion or leek, diced
  • coconut oil
  • dash of dried cinnamon and dash of dried cumin
  • 1 butternet squash, peeled and cut into large cubes
  • 1-2 ripe pears
  • 1.5 L stock (homemade bone or vegetable)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 can of coconut milk

Let’s Begin

  1. Put the coconut oil in a pot and add the onion or leek and cinnamon and cumin.
  2. Fry until fragrant and the onion is soft.
  3. Add the squash pieces and pear and stir to coat in spices.
  4. Add the stock and more water if needed to *just* cover the squash/pear.
  5. Let this simmer until the squash is cooked through and soft.
  6. Puree with a hand blender or in a food processor until smooth.
  7. Add salt and pepper to taste and serve with 1-2 TBS of coconut milk in each bowl.

Meagan Wilson is a parent educator and author of the now-retired seasonal series of Whole Family Rhythms. After finishing a BA, she went on to complete her Foundations in Steiner Education and Anthroposophy at Sydney Steiner College, as well as her Waldorf Early Childhood Certification at the Rudolf Steiner Centre in Toronto. She has received her certification as a Simplicity Parenting Family Life Coach and has supported hundreds of parents to create a strong family rhythm unique to their own values and culture. She has four young children. Meagan provides resources, support and information to parents who are looking for a bridge to cross between their unique family life and their children’s (often but not always) Waldorf schools.